@John Dyhouse: The thing about the chord buddy that is unique is that you can teach yourself quickly. yes you will need to build up your finger pad but you will need to do that anyway without the chord buddy. The main purpose of it is to teach you hand placement, sound, and rythmn first. Then after you have mastered that you can move on to learning more on the topic you are discussing.
I know many new guitarists get overwhelmed with a huge barrage of information and give up after a few weeks of practicing out of frustration. However, it doesn’t always have to be like this and learning to play the guitar can be a fun and enjoyable process with the right instructions. And this was the motivation behind the creation of GuitarPlayerWorld.com.
There's an abundance of guitar information out there on the web, some good, some not. I stumbled across Justin Sandercoe's site a year ago and now tell everyone about it. The lessons are conveyed so clearly, concisely and in the most congenial way. The site is laid out logically as well so you can to go straight to your area of interest... beginner, blues, rock, folk, jazz, rhythm, fingerpicking... it's all there and more. Spend ten minutes with Justin and you'll not only play better but feel better too. From novice to know-it-all, everyone will learn something from Sandercoe.

If you alternate fretted notes with open strings you can create a cascading sound of awesomeness. The video below describes how you can take a scale and substitute as many fretted notes as you want with open strings (E, A, D, G, B, E). The beginning of the lick in the video starts off by descending the G Mixolydian scale (G, A, B, C, D, E, F) from G: G (fretted), F (fretted), E (open), D (fretted), C (fretted), B (open), A (fretted), G (fretted). The video below shows the rest of the lick. This second video demonstrates descending and ascending scales while using open strings!
These last two tabs feel a little bit out of place, and it’s hard to tell whether or not this is content that you will also get if you go through the Guitar Fundamentals course. On the surface, this appears to give you the opportunity to go through a quick intro with the Practice for Beginners and Tuning & Guitar Maintenance tabs, or to jump into a more lengthy process with the Core Learning System.
Pierre Bensusan on justinguitar.com! Pierre Bensuan (www.pierrebensusan.com) "Lucky you, guitar players from all over the world, to take advantage of the tutorials presented in Justin's comprehensive website! Whatever the style you fancy, Justin is there for you with generous and precise guidance to help you enhance your playing and by doing so, introduce you to so many ways of approaching the guitar and discover new artists along the way. I wish there would have been such a medium and decitated host around when I started to learn how to play. Bravo Justin, and my gratitude for bringing music to the heart and ears of many!"
There is a better player in all of us, but we often get trapped in unhealthy, tension-filled technique. Join Stephanie Bradley as we explore the most efficient ways to play faster, cleaner and healthier. We will dissect the requirements of speed, while studying the techniques of alternate, tremolo, sweep, and economy picking within a rock and lead context.
Through School of Rock's private guitar lessons and group rehearsals, children learn to play the guitar and eventually perform the songs they love in a fun, supportive and comfortable atmosphere. Based on the student's age and skill level, guitar lessons for kids are part of every School of Rock music program including Rookies, Rock 101, Performance, House Band, and AllStars.
The first thing I did when I got the Chordbuddy was I took it out of the box and try to attach it to my guitar. Now, I did do some reading up prior to receiving the Chordbuddy and one of the biggest problem that came up was that people just weren’t able to attach it to their guitar properly. Without reading the instructions, I of course, had the same problem. However, once you know how to properly install the Chordbuddy (which I’ll explain in the next section), you should have no troubles.

I concur, lots of very good lessons on Guitar Tricks. However, one thing I don’t see commented on is that for most of the song lessons and some technical lessons you cannot download and print the music (which I understand for published songs because it is protected) but the on-screen music notation doesn’t scroll with the video lesson, jam track etc. (like it does on several other lesson sites). All that is visible is one 8 or 12 bar section of the song. In other words, short of memorizing the song, there is no way to play along. Made the comment to GT customer support and they said essentially – Yeah we know. My analogy is a canoe without a paddle. Not totally useless but almost.
I love love love these guitars. No gimmicks. They are pure class (but are capable of absolute fury!) :) Think a Telecaster can’t rock? Johnny Greenwood respectfully disagrees. Check out Bonnie Raitt using a Strat to lay down some nasty slide licks. SRV nearly tears the strings off his Strat. Would you prefer something a little funkier? Here’s Prince playing the greatest guitar solo of all time on a Telecaster.
Lesson text is a short summary of the lesson, while the lesson series shows you all of the different videos contained in the series, allowing you to pick whichever one you might want to view. So be aware that one lesson doesn’t usually equal one video. It’s often closer to ten separate videos. Though the interface is intuitive and easy to navigate.

The layout and scope of Guitar Tricks’ content is perfect for those who want to get into a system quickly and start playing guitar as soon as possible. There’s room to grow and the content isn’t all just for beginners. However, the ideal member, those who I’d bet would be most happy with their membership, will be on the beginner’s side of the guitar looking for a time-sensitive way to learn.
In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.
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