Now many people are going to ask about other brands, like why don’t I suggest Gibson guitars? It really is a personal taste thing, and it’ll ultimately depend on yours. Perhaps by the style of music you play or the artists you admire. For me, Fender guitars represent the best in quality and feel. Many Gibson style guitars have fatter necks, bigger frets, are heavy, and feel and sound “muddy” to me, whereas the feel of a Stratocaster– light, slender, classic– feels, plays, and looks fast.  :)
This is not a substitute for learning scales. At some point down the road you are going to want to dive into music theory at least a little bit, if nothing else so you can understand how scales work and how chords are built. For now you are a beginner, and this exercise can go a long way toward loosening up your fretting hand and improving your technique.
Pinched harmonics are achieved by letting some of the skin of your picking hand touch to the guitar string during or immediately after picking. I personally feel it's easier to pinch harmonics using my index finger but others prefer using the thumb. You'll have to explore a little to find the best spot where pinching a harmonic is most likely to occur. Be warned, pinching harmonics is addictive. Once you find that sweet spot you will most likely make your guitar squeal for days while you perfect the technique.
While there may be a lack of tutor choice compared to others, such as JamPlay, which boasts 89 different instructors, you still get a very experienced guitar teacher in Justin – having performed around the world, playing with original and cover bands, and featuring in guitar media regularly. Due to his popularity he has even been branded ‘One of the most influential guitar teachers in history’ by a major British newspaper.

I have a nerve problem in my left hand which causes numbness and pain; therefore, I cannot use my fingers on the strings. The Chordbuddy is very helpful for those who have physical hand issues. All I want to do is enjoy playing my guitar at home and don't expect to become an expert. the Chordbuddy has given me back the joy of playing for my own enjoyment.

* Make your guitar talk - With a little practice, a whammy bar and a wah wah effect pedal you can make your guitar talk by simulating voices. The trick here is to start with the whammy bar depressed and raise it up while fretting notes and sliding to other notes. Try making words by alternating between depressing and releasing the bar during note changes. The wah wah pedal (or a phaser pedal) helps to give it this trick a more vocal sound.


My granddaughters took voice, guitar, and piano from Missy from the age of third grade through high school. I selected Missy due to her experience: classically trained on piano and voice during her formative years, studied at Berklee College of Music, Boston, toured the country as a solo singer/songwriter, and played world-famous and iconic venues, including the late CBGBs in New York City and the Bluebird in Nashville. You can find her on iTunes, and one of her students, Paul Thomas Mitchell (a.k.a. Tommy Mitchell) was on the hit television show, America's Got Talent.

For those of you who play guitar, you might have noticed that some of my tasty licks aren’t so tasty. I’m no Stevie Ray Vaughn. You don’t need to be superstar to have tons of fun with this stuff. Despite not being the best guitar player, I’ve played my songs in front of 1000’s of people in live venues, had songs I’ve written and recorded played on San Diego’s leading rock station, and played in some super cool seedy dive bars to drunken hipsters. That’s just a few among a countless other memorable experiences. You don’t need to be a genius– half the battle is just showing up.
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