You’ll also notice that each button requires a different amount of pressure in order for the chord to play properly. The further away the buttons are from the guitar’s nut, the less pressure is required. Vice-versa, the closer you get to the nut, the more pressure is required (i.e. blue button requires the least amount of pressure while the yellow button requires the most).
In their quest to innovate, I think JamPlay really took the camera angle thing overboard. Sometimes they show so many angles of hands on the screen, that it can get confusing and not intuitive at all. There is an camera angle which I really dislike, the "teacher angle", which is a camera above the teacher aiming at his fretting hand. Mixing angles of the same hand on a screen is not cool, I literally get dizzy watching it.
Now we're getting somewhere! In order to become skillful on the guitar, we'll need to build the muscles in our hands, and learn to stretch our fingers. Scales are a good, albeit a not very exciting way to do this. Before we start, look at the diagram above to understand how fingers on the "fretting hand" (the hand that plays notes on the neck) are commonly identified. The thumb is labeled as "T", the index finger is the "first finger", the middle finger is the "second finger", and so on.
When playing the guitar sitting down, the body of the guitar will rest on one of your legs. In most styles of guitar playing, the guitar will rest on the leg farthest away from the headstock. This means, a person playing the guitar in a right-handed fashion will typically rest the guitar on his/her right leg, while someone playing the guitar in a lefty manner will rest it on their left leg. (NOTE: proper classical guitarist technique dictates the exact OPPOSITE of the above, but for this lesson, let's stick to our initial explanation)
There’s only one thing I would comment on, and that is GF1 and 2 is lead by the same person, and the only songs you’re going to be playing are what I’d term as country love songs. If you’re ok with that, then you’re all set. If (like me) this sort of music grates on you, you’re going to find 1&2 very hard, and like me you’ll need to find some other way of practicing the lessons.
After the 3 Stages, we have an Essential Skills module which you could check out any time you want - it's stuff that you'll find super helpful on your journey :) You'll probably find my Practical Music Theory course super fun if you're the type who likes to understand what they're doing - it's not essential for beginners but most people seem to really enjoy it!
You've always wanted to play the guitar. Now the ChordBuddy Guitar Learning System will make your dream come true! As seen on Shark Tank, the ingenious ChordBuddy attaches to the neck of your electric or acoustic guitar, easily guiding you through basic chord fingering positions. As your skills develop, you'll gradually remove the ChordBuddy — and within two months you'll be strumming all the chords on your own. It's like training-wheels for the guitar! Includes instruction book and companion DVD with two-month lesson plan, plus a songbook with over 100 songs.
Les Wise on justinguitar.com! Les Wise (www.thedeliberatemusician.com) "After teaching guitar and music theory to thousands of students over past three decades, I thought that I had basically 'seen it all' when it comes to guitar instruction. Then I discovered Justin’s website, and man was I impressed! Justin’s caring spirit, attention to detail, vast knowledge base, and especially his lucid, laidback and nurturing style, allow students to fall in love with the learning process. You see, it’s not enough to simply find out how to play a few cool licks or chords. A truly great teacher will make you fall in love with the process of discovery so that you can unlock the best within you. Justin is one of these great teachers, and I highly recommend justinguitar.com to anyone who wants to tap into their best selves. "
So anyhow, both GuitarTricks and JamPlay are great sites, it all comes down to you, the student. If you are diligent and dedicate enough time and practice to it, you’ll succeed either way. The reason I recommend GuitarTricks to beginners is because it gives them one less chance to sidestep and wonder around looking at other teacher’s lessons when things get a bit harder. That’s what a lot of people do on my site.
Guitar Tricks has become one of the biggest and most popular guitar lesson websites, since its inception in 1998. Today it's thought by many to be the best place to learn guitar online. Their format is almost entirely video-based, with short instruction bits that are usually less than 10 minutes in length. In this Guitar Tricks review, we’ll cover that format and show you how it performs in comparison to other guitar lesson sites.
If you alternate fretted notes with open strings you can create a cascading sound of awesomeness. The video below describes how you can take a scale and substitute as many fretted notes as you want with open strings (E, A, D, G, B, E). The beginning of the lick in the video starts off by descending the G Mixolydian scale (G, A, B, C, D, E, F) from G: G (fretted), F (fretted), E (open), D (fretted), C (fretted), B (open), A (fretted), G (fretted). The video below shows the rest of the lick. This second video demonstrates descending and ascending scales while using open strings!
In this post, I’m going to be doing a complete Chordbuddy review. If you don’t know what Chordbuddy is, it’s essentially a beginner’s learning system that allows guitar players to press down a single button to produce a guitar chord instead of playing the chord with your fingers directly on the strings. Now at first, you might be thinking what’s the point of that? If my fingers aren’t making the actual chord shapes how will I ever learn to play additional chords let alone the ones you can play with Chordbuddy?
The guitar is a remarkably hackable instrument for a million reasons that will be revealed to you as you spend more time with it. As you go along in your journey you’ll find a million shortcuts and fun ways to learn fast. I’ve rarely heard any of this stuff from guitar teaches, so beware, trust your instincts, and learn from people who can show you where you want to be.
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