While there may be a lack of tutor choice compared to others, such as JamPlay, which boasts 89 different instructors, you still get a very experienced guitar teacher in Justin – having performed around the world, playing with original and cover bands, and featuring in guitar media regularly. Due to his popularity he has even been branded ‘One of the most influential guitar teachers in history’ by a major British newspaper.
I have to admit – I’ve always wanted to be a rock star ! When Travis entered the tank I knew Chordbuddy might be the only way for me to achieve my dream. Years later we know who the real rock star of this story is – Travis. I did this deal because I could see the passion he had for teaching guitar. He truly wants to share music with the the world and developed a foolproof system for learning one of the most common instruments. More than that – I loved that he invented ChordBuddy so his daughter would share his love for music – true dedication to his craft and his family! Four years after making the deal, there is no shortage of ChordBuddy success stories and I know that this simple and innovative product is the only guitar learning system you’ll ever need to be a rock star like Travis.
"My partner and I scheduled lessons together with Jaime to learn the guitar. We are both beginners, so we chose Jaime because of his several reviews of being very knowledgable about the guitar and patient with people, which proved to be true. Overall, our first experience with Jaime was great! We really enjoyed our lesson and look forward to many more."
Lesson text is a short summary of the lesson, while the lesson series shows you all of the different videos contained in the series, allowing you to pick whichever one you might want to view. So be aware that one lesson doesn’t usually equal one video. It’s often closer to ten separate videos. Though the interface is intuitive and easy to navigate.
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The songs are arranged from easy beginners chords and layer up as you go thought the book. but they really work best with the website where Justin plays and teaches you how to play them then adds a few tricks and skills to advance each song too, so try watch all the songs even if you're not too interested in the song because there are gems of wisdom in them all. (I drew the line at Britney spears tho ;)
Now, that we know about the basic parts of a guitar, it's time to get our hands dirty and start learning to play it. Get yourself an armless chair, and take a seat. You should be sitting comfortably, with your back against the back of the chair. Slouching significantly is a no-no; you'll not only end up with a sore back, you'll develop bad habits on the guitar.
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Fact is that thousands of popular songs can be played with 8 simple chords or less. Learn just the A chord, D chord and E chord and you'll be able to play hundreds of blues, folk, pop and rock songs. Why is this so? Because rock, pop, folk and blues songwriters all use the same handful of chords - it's their melodies and arrangements that make their songs distinctive, NOT the chords they are using in the song.
This guitar trick is a variation on artificial harmonics, which itself is a variation on natural harmonics. The natural harmonics are most commonly played on the 5th, 7th, and 12th frets. To play these, you lightly press the left hand on top of the fret without pressing the string to the fret. Then, you pick the note. To make an artificial harmonic, you regularly fret a note with the left hand and then use your right hand index finger to lightly press on that string twelve frets above the fretted note. Then, you pick the string. With this technique, you have to hold the pick between the thumb and middle finger. Finally, to play harp artificial harmonics, you alternate plucking a note using the right hand ring or pinky finger with picking artificial harmonics. This creates a harp-like sound! This technique works well when you can fret a chord using four or more strings without repeating any notes. The video below shows the great guitarist Lenny Breau describing how to accomplish this:

Minutes 60-600. Pick up the guitar everyday for 20 days for 30 minutes or so. You can do this while you do other things like watch TV or chit chat. Get your fingers used to moving around on the fretboard. Start jamming out some John Denver baby. Please do sing along. Eventually try to keep up with tempo of the changes in the actual song. Once you can change your chords on time, focus on improving your “touch” with your right hand. Strum the chords in a way that it adds texture to the recording (if you are playing along with the man himself.)
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