Hi there, that’s a good question, I had to go into my accounts on jamplay and guitartricks to look around for you. It looks to me like Jamplay has more fingerstyle lessons, they even have dedicated courses on various subgenres of fingerstyle guitar. So if you are at an intermediate level already, and want start “mastering” fingerstyle guitar, I would recommend Jamplay. If you’re still a beginner, than it would be best if you reach an intermediate level first on Guitartricks, so you are well rounded in everything guitar. I always recommend that specializing towards any given genre should come after you have a solid knowledge of the basics, and are comfortable with anything they throw at you 🙂

Many beginning guitarists ask the same question: which are the best guitar brands? Is there a particular brand that outshines the others? Finding the best guitar really comes down to your interests and determining the type of music you want to learn. Although the material you’ll learn for electric, classical, and acoustic is very similar up front, certain guitars are more appropriate for specific genres of music. In this article, we’ll dive into several top guitar brands to help you

First: I am now 73 years on this earth. Last February I decided to try learning some about guitar playing. For me it was like one of those things i'd thought about a lot but never made the time to pursue. Then I thought I might be to old to add new talent to this body. After reading and viewing a lot of information on line and contact with a local teaching facility I decided to give Guitartricks a try. I am a DIY person and if given good instruction am able to learn quickly. I found the instruction at Guitartricks to be very clear and concise so I was able to quickly put the instructions into practice. I started with Lisa McCormick who made me familiar with the basics and led me clearly to achieve my goals of being able to entertain family and myself. I have Arthritis in my hands so some of the four finger and Bar cords are just out of reach for me. That has not stopped me from learning the basic cords and having a whale of a time playing with those. Surprised me at just how many songs you can keep up with using only a few cords! Guitartricks offers a whole lot for your money and always offers extra help if you have a need for some. They offer one on one, and group sessions if you are inclined. The instructors are great people who care about you being able to achieve your personal goals with guitar. I owe special thanks to Lisa McCormick, Caren Armstrong, and Anders Mouridsen. If you want to learn guitar, and are willing to apply the time needed for practice, Guitartricks is the place. Take it from this old kid you're never to old to learn some new tricks. Thank You,
The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.
Guitar Center is proud to offer this free intro to guitar class for kids ages 5 to 13. In this lesson, your child will have the opportunity to learn the anatomy of the guitar, best techniques for strumming and picking, three new chords, and will have learned to play a brand new song, in a fun and friendly environment. The Learn to Play: Guitar is a 45 minute group lesson for your kids, starts at 6:30 PM, is free. Guitars will be provided, or students may bring their own.
This diagram illustrates the first chord we are going to play, a G major chord (often simply called a "G chord"). Take your second finger, and put it on the third fret of the sixth string. Next, take your first finger, and put it on the second fret of the fifth string. Lastly, put your third finger on the third fret of the first string. Make sure all of your fingers are curled and are not touching any strings they're not supposed to. Now, using your pick, strike all six strings in one fluid motion. Notes should ring all together, not one at a time (this could take some practice). Voila! Your first chord.
– The teacher you choose at JamPlay depends on your personal preference. Check out all of the longer beginner courses (there are some that just have a few lessons, so those won’t be thorough), and choose a teacher you find sympathetic. Just make sure you don’t jump around in between courses, people tend to do that when they are faced with something harder. Stick with one course.

The above diagram may look confusing... fear not, it's one of the most common methods of explaining notes on the guitar and is actually quite easy to read. The above represents the neck of the guitar when looked at head on. The first vertical line on the left of the diagram is the sixth string. The line to the right of that is the fifth string. And so on. The horizontal lines in the diagram represent the frets on the guitar... the space between the top horizontal line, and the one below it is the first fret. The space between that second horizontal line from the top and the one below it is the second fret. And so on. The "0" above the diagram represents the open string for the string it is positioned above. Finally, the black dots are indicators that these notes should be played.
The teen and tween years are the make or break years for most people, in deciding whether they’re going to stick with a childhood hobby or interest, for life. As you go through puberty, and begin preparing for life as an adult, and responsibilities pile on your plate, the first things to go tend to be the personal interests you’re passionate about, because they don’t pay the bills. Also, because they’re not an official part of your school curriculum. In other words, what was once a must-have becomes a nice-to-have.
Once you’re comfortable playing the chord shape that corresponds to the tab you removed, you can move on to removing the next tab, the next tab, and the next tab. Once all of the tabs are removed, the ultimate goal is that you should have a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts of how to play guitar and shouldn’t require the Chordbuddy anymore. At this point, you can remove the Chordbuddy system completely from your guitar and you’re free to explore.

Guitar Center Shreveport provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Shreveport area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Shreveport can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
Acoustic: I recommend a Yamaha solid top acoustic guitar. This guitar plays just as good as some that are many hundreds of dollars more expensive. It can be difficult to manufacture quality acoustics at low prices due to the importance of a solid top finish. When I was in college I scratched together the cash to buy a handmade acoustic guitar that was over $1,000 (I won’t mention the brand) but that guitar was nowhere near as good as this Yamaha.
Beginner to advanced, acoustic to electric, blues to country... we have the guitar lessons you need to move your playing forward. We consistently film, edit and publish around 11 hours of new guitar lessons every 30 days; an enormous amount of material to keep your playing focused and interests piqued. With new lessons added on a daily basis, you cannot find another company as dedicated to teaching you how to play guitar as JamPlay.
You may have trouble finding a guitar teacher who is on the same wavelength you are on. In other posts I’ve recounted my first experiences with a guitar instructor back when I first started playing. The guy did not seem to care one whit about what kind of music I was into or what my goals were as a new musician. He was going to teach me songs he wanted me to learn, not help me explore music that inspired me. Or perhaps he just thought a kid wearing an Ozzy Osbourne t-shirt would also be into Lionel Richie.
Try out different strumming patterns and rhythms. Once you're able to produce a good sounding chord, try strumming it at different tempos and rhythms. Rhythm is based on your strumming pattern, and how long you're holding your notes. Try a basic 1-2-3-4 beat, otherwise known as a 4/4. The number on the top represents how many beats there are in the measure. Try strumming up and down in different progressions to create a different sound for your rhythm. Once you get a basic rhythm down, you can start to incorporate quicker or slower strumming.[8]
Thinking you can use this chord buddy video to learn how to play guitar is like thinking you can use... Tiger Woods golf clubs to win the masters. Knowing which strings to target when you strum and when to switch chords is much more challenging than he makes it look. Having a professional guitarist play using the device to show how easy it is to play is deceptive. See More
* Detune dive bomb - A.K.A. Poor man's dive bomb. On guitars with non locking string nuts, you can simulate a dive bomb by turning the tuning key of the low E string down while the note is ringing. This trick is great when used on hard tail bridge guitars with no floating tremolos. You'll have to know how to tune a guitar by ear if you intend to use this trick frequently.
It’s actually very easy: Play an open sixth string note, followed by the first fret of the sixth string with your first (pointer) finger. Then play the second fret on the same string with your second finger. Then the third with your third (ring) finger, and finally you play the fourth fret on the sixth string with your fourth (pinky) finger. Incidentally, this movement up the neck of one fret a time (or half-step) is called the Chromatic Scale, which is where this exercise gets its name.

From a practical perspective, teaching yourself guitar may be the only option. Guitar lessons cost money. If you’ve just scrounged your pennies together in order to afford a decent starter guitar, you may not be eager to throw down another twenty bucks a week or more. Compound this with the fact that most guitar instructors have their own methods and will teach you at their pace, not yours. This makes sense from their standpoint, but it could get a little frustrating and expensive from your point of view.
* Finger tapping - Made popular by Eddie Van Halen (listen to Eruption), finger tapping is one of the easiest guitar tricks to learn that will make you sound like you are playing something totally complex even though you are not. To finger tap, use a finger of your guitar picking hand to play notes on the fretboard by pressing notes down then pulling them off to notes of the fretting hand. It's common to use the middle finger for tapping so that you can keep a hold of the guitar pick.
I have heard how giving you are in so many respects of music schooling and I must say that I am impressed. You remind me of the pure idealism that we had in starting Apple. If I were young, with time, I'd likely offer to join and help you in your endeavours. Keep making people happy, not just in their own learning, but in the example you set for them. 
In the world of piano, if a student is learning a piece of music, there can be several different technical variations so that the student can play the music they want without overwhelming themselves with something that is much too difficult. While some of this exists for modern guitar, it tends to be quite limited unless a student is studying classical guitar.
"At 50 I finally decided to learn to play guitar. With my hectic schedule, I needed something that was ready and available when I had time. Learning Guitar 1 was a fantastic introduction to guitar basics. I love that it started with elementary, straightforward concepts and chords that I could grasp and learn. It even talks about HOW to practice. Then the course built on those simple things by adding other simple chords, strumming, and then working up to simple songs. I'm on my way!" - Daniel Rode, TrueFire Student
Sound familiar? I know what that’s like… I’ve been there, and I’ve had several students that have been there. Playing the same licks, the same riffs, the same songs on your guitar over and over and over again just gets old so fast.  You’re willing to put in the work, you’re willing to practice hard, BUT WHAT SHOULD YOU PRACTICE?? HOW CAN I LEARN TO BE CREATIVE? IF ONLY I COULD PLAY THAT ONE SOLO!

These last two tabs feel a little bit out of place, and it’s hard to tell whether or not this is content that you will also get if you go through the Guitar Fundamentals course. On the surface, this appears to give you the opportunity to go through a quick intro with the Practice for Beginners and Tuning & Guitar Maintenance tabs, or to jump into a more lengthy process with the Core Learning System.

The neck of the guitar adjoins the "body" of the instrument. The body of the guitar will vary greatly from guitar to guitar. Most acoustic and classical guitars have a hollowed out body, and a "sound hole," designed to project the sound of the guitar. Most electric guitars have a solid body, and thus will not have a sound hole. Electric guitars will instead have "pick-ups" where the soundhole is located. These "pick-ups" are essentially small microphones, which allow the capture the sound of the ringing strings, allowing them to be amplified.
The guitar is a remarkably hackable instrument for a million reasons that will be revealed to you as you spend more time with it. As you go along in your journey you’ll find a million shortcuts and fun ways to learn fast. I’ve rarely heard any of this stuff from guitar teaches, so beware, trust your instincts, and learn from people who can show you where you want to be.
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