Hey Jared, I just had a look at Jamorama recently, since they upgraded their offering not long ago. They used to sell a guitar lesson ebook which was created over a decade ago, so it was pretty old to say the least. They launched the new site 2 months ago, and are now focusing on video lessons, just like Jamplay and Guitartricks. I had a good look around Jamorama, and to tell you the truth, it’s not looking very good:
Steve Vai on justinguitar.com! Steve Vai (www.vai.com) "I have checked out Justin's site and found it to be comprehensive and informative. I have always felt that learning about music and especially music theory applied to the guitar, is helpful in finding your own unique voice on the instrument and expanding your creative horizons. Along with his insight into teaching and his fantastic abilities on the instrument, Justin has created a powerful go-to-place for anyone interested in exploring the instrument to their potential. Just don't hurt yourself."
Hi there. We definitely appreciate the feedback. Just in case you did not know, looping is part of the app. The icon for looping looks like a circle with an arrow. As for songs with multiple guitar parts, we try to teach all of the guitar sections in a song, and then offer an option for playing a song with a single guitar. But if you want to learn all of the parts, it's in there as well. Otherwise, your comments are really helpful and gives us a better understanding of what users are looking for in lessons. Thank you!
* Make your guitar talk - With a little practice, a whammy bar and a wah wah effect pedal you can make your guitar talk by simulating voices. The trick here is to start with the whammy bar depressed and raise it up while fretting notes and sliding to other notes. Try making words by alternating between depressing and releasing the bar during note changes. The wah wah pedal (or a phaser pedal) helps to give it this trick a more vocal sound.
To quote Alec Baldwin's character in the movie The Edge: What one man can do another can do. He was only trying to kill a Grizzly Bear with a stick, which may seem easier than copping Eddie Van Halen. Paraphrasing and putting this in terms that work for us: What one guitar player can do another can do. Really, the deciding factor is how hard you want to work at it.

One other cool thing about electric guitars– you can plug them into your computer and use a program like Apple’s Garageband as an amplifier. You can basically have 100’s of classic sounds available virtually. You can “jam” virtually with your computer and create full-on recordings on your laptop. You’ll just need a “pre-amp,” which is a device that amplifies the signal from your guitar before it sends it to your computer. I’d recommend something like the Focusrite Scarlett
Now many people are going to ask about other brands, like why don’t I suggest Gibson guitars? It really is a personal taste thing, and it’ll ultimately depend on yours. Perhaps by the style of music you play or the artists you admire. For me, Fender guitars represent the best in quality and feel. Many Gibson style guitars have fatter necks, bigger frets, are heavy, and feel and sound “muddy” to me, whereas the feel of a Stratocaster– light, slender, classic– feels, plays, and looks fast.  :)
The iconic Les Paul Standard is celebrated by the world’s greatest musicians as the standard for perfection in the world of electric guitars. The new Les Paul Standard features the popular asymmetrical SlimTaper neck profile with Ultra-Modern weight relief for increased comfort and playability. Impeccable looks are highlighted by the powerful tonewood combination of mahogany back and carved maple AAA figured top. BurstBucker Pro humbuckers provide modern and classic tones, while immense tonal variety from comes from 4 push-pull knobs. Includes hardshell case.
I have to admit – I’ve always wanted to be a rock star ! When Travis entered the tank I knew Chordbuddy might be the only way for me to achieve my dream. Years later we know who the real rock star of this story is – Travis. I did this deal because I could see the passion he had for teaching guitar. He truly wants to share music with the the world and developed a foolproof system for learning one of the most common instruments. More than that – I loved that he invented ChordBuddy so his daughter would share his love for music – true dedication to his craft and his family! Four years after making the deal, there is no shortage of ChordBuddy success stories and I know that this simple and innovative product is the only guitar learning system you’ll ever need to be a rock star like Travis.

But than again, JamPlay does have a cool scale library tool (which is great for intermediate-advanced players), the production quality of JamPlay videos is generally higher (the educational value is about the same), and they release more new lessons and mini courses in different genres for intermediate-advanced guitarists, which might make them a better choice if you're an established player.

For students who have long thought about picking up the acoustic or electric guitar, this course will provide an easy-access foundation that will get you playing. When first learning guitar, it is important to have the material presented in stages, in an enjoyable way that allows you to grasp the basics of the instrument and music. The course begins simply with the parts of the guitar, the names of the strings, tuning, and technique—whether finger-style or pick. It then explores the basics of music theory with such topics as scales, triads, power chords, and fingering and shapes.
The neck of the guitar adjoins the "body" of the instrument. The body of the guitar will vary greatly from guitar to guitar. Most acoustic and classical guitars have a hollowed out body, and a "sound hole," designed to project the sound of the guitar. Most electric guitars have a solid body, and thus will not have a sound hole. Electric guitars will instead have "pick-ups" where the soundhole is located. These "pick-ups" are essentially small microphones, which allow the capture the sound of the ringing strings, allowing them to be amplified.

Contrary to some other reviewers of this book, I like the book's set-up. New chords are given at the beginning at each stage only. There isn't a section that gives you chord diagrams so it forces you to memorize chord diagrams as you progress through the book rather than rely on convenient chord diagrams above every lyric. It isn't a chord reference book so if you're looking for that, there are plenty of cheap ones on Amazon or even free on the internet.
On the GuitarTricks forum, you risk to get lost reading threads for hours, and forget to take some lessons! They have both open community discussions and subscriber only sections, that way you will not feel left out before getting a paid membership. In conclusion, Guitar Tricks has tons of lessons and learning material and it has hours of fun when your guitar practice is over!
A far as the other learning material goes (books and DVD) they both looked fine as far as readability and simplicity. Right off the bat, I did feel as though the whole learning system is more geared towards children (which I’m sure it mostly is) rather than adults. This comes from the color scheme, overall look and feel of the learning material, DVD content etc. Now don’t get me wrong, that doesn’t mean adults can’t use this product, it’s just an observation that I noticed during my first impressions.
Acoustic: I recommend a Yamaha solid top acoustic guitar. This guitar plays just as good as some that are many hundreds of dollars more expensive. It can be difficult to manufacture quality acoustics at low prices due to the importance of a solid top finish. When I was in college I scratched together the cash to buy a handmade acoustic guitar that was over $1,000 (I won’t mention the brand) but that guitar was nowhere near as good as this Yamaha.
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