There's an abundance of guitar information out there on the web, some good, some not. I stumbled across Justin Sandercoe's site a year ago and now tell everyone about it. The lessons are conveyed so clearly, concisely and in the most congenial way. The site is laid out logically as well so you can to go straight to your area of interest... beginner, blues, rock, folk, jazz, rhythm, fingerpicking... it's all there and more. Spend ten minutes with Justin and you'll not only play better but feel better too. From novice to know-it-all, everyone will learn something from Sandercoe.


While there may be a lack of tutor choice compared to others, such as JamPlay, which boasts 89 different instructors, you still get a very experienced guitar teacher in Justin – having performed around the world, playing with original and cover bands, and featuring in guitar media regularly. Due to his popularity he has even been branded ‘One of the most influential guitar teachers in history’ by a major British newspaper.
Now, pick up your guitar, and hold it so the back of the body of the instrument comes in contact with your stomach/chest, and the bottom of the neck runs parallel to the floor. The thickest string on the guitar should be the closest to your face, while the thinnest should be closest to the floor. If this isn't the case, turn the guitar the in other direction. Typically, a right-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the left, whereas a left-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the right.
Sandercoe has been featured and written for Guitar Techniques magazine, including the Led Zeppelin cover feature, issue GT108 and the Tasty Chord column. He has also been featured in Total Guitar and in Guitar magazine, with The Counterfeit Stones. He has been published in Guitar Tutor, the magazine of the Registry Of Guitar Tutors, and has instructed masterclasses about teaching transcribing at their annual conference. He has also given masterclasses for The Institute of Contemporary Music Performance and The International Guitar Federation.
If you take the rock 1 course for example, an advanced course, most of the technical stuff is just not explained, teacher says “just remember to move by 3 frets, or just remember it is like that, you don’t need to understand why for now”. And yeah it becomes frustrating to have to look on internet very often when you pay exactly for not having to go somewhere else.

Unfortunately, before you begin playing, you'll really need to tune your guitar. The problem is, it is, at first, a relatively difficult task, one that becomes much easier over time. If you know of anyone who plays guitar, who could do the job for you, it is advised that you get them to tune your instrument. Alternately, you could invest in a "guitar tuner," a relatively inexpensive device which listens to the sound of each string and advises you (via a few blinking lights) on what you need to do in order to get the note in tune.

Download apps that will help you learn how to play. There are apps that you can download to your mobile device that will help you learn how to play the acoustic guitar. These apps range from step-to-step guides on how to play, to apps that can act as mixers and recorders. Go to the app store for your device and try to find some apps that can help you.
There are many people out there who doubt that they have the ability to play guitar, so let me tell you right away: your hands aren’t too big or too small, you’re not too young or too old, and it doesn’t matter if you want to play electric or acoustic. Everyone has their own challenges, but I’m confident that if you practice and put your mind to it, you can play the guitar.

In the “classical” world, composers would oftentimes write musical studies called “etudes.” These pieces would generally be musically pleasing, but the sole purpose was to develop an instrumentalist’s playing technique. Examples of these can be seen in classical guitar music, where many pieces have the same right hand arpeggio pattern that remains constant throughout the entire piece.


Sandercoe has been featured and written for Guitar Techniques magazine, including the Led Zeppelin cover feature, issue GT108 and the Tasty Chord column. He has also been featured in Total Guitar and in Guitar magazine, with The Counterfeit Stones. He has been published in Guitar Tutor, the magazine of the Registry Of Guitar Tutors, and has instructed masterclasses about teaching transcribing at their annual conference. He has also given masterclasses for The Institute of Contemporary Music Performance and The International Guitar Federation.
The layout and scope of Guitar Tricks’ content is perfect for those who want to get into a system quickly and start playing guitar as soon as possible. There’s room to grow and the content isn’t all just for beginners. However, the ideal member, those who I’d bet would be most happy with their membership, will be on the beginner’s side of the guitar looking for a time-sensitive way to learn.
Richard Bennett on justinguitar.com! Richard Bennett (www.richard-bennett.com) "There's an abundance of guitar information out there on the web, some good, some not. I stumbled across Justin Sandercoe's site a year ago and now tell everyone about it. The lessons are conveyed so clearly, concisely and in the most congenial way. The site is laid out logically as well so you can to go straight to your area of interest... beginner, blues, rock, folk, jazz, rhythm, fingerpicking... it's all there and more. Spend ten minutes with Justin and you'll not only play better but feel better too. From novice to know-it-all, everyone will learn something from Sandercoe."

In the “classical” world, composers would oftentimes write musical studies called “etudes.” These pieces would generally be musically pleasing, but the sole purpose was to develop an instrumentalist’s playing technique. Examples of these can be seen in classical guitar music, where many pieces have the same right hand arpeggio pattern that remains constant throughout the entire piece.


Guitar Compass features hundreds of free guitar lesson videos. These online lessons are designed to teach you how to play guitar by covering the absolute basics up to more advanced soloing concepts and techniques. The lessons span different difficultly levels and genres like blues, rock, country, and jazz. Each lesson is designed to introduce you to a subject and get to know our instructors and their teaching style. To access more lessons and in-depth instruction, try a free 7 day trial of our premium membership.
Guitar Tricks is described as a 'step-by-step curriculum' and it really does live up to that phrase. I appreciate the simplicity of the step-by-step nature in the structure of the site and the way all the classes and songs I watched were presented. You know exactly where to go next (although of course you are not limited to the pathway – you are free to go wherever you like and explore, return, repeat as much as you like).
The videos for the lessons all have great pictures, and you can pick between low, medium, and high resolution. They are clearly recorded in a proper and professional studio. They do their best to show you tabs on the side to get a better idea of what the instructor is playing. There also doesn't seem to be as many "far-away" shots during the lessons. A "far-away" shot is one of my personal pet-peeves on instructional sites.
The chord name is given above the words of the lyrics and on the corresponding page Justin gives his recommended strumming pattern as well as some tips and trivia. There are other chord strum-a-long books out there but most of them usually just give the chords and the lyrics and not much else. You definitely get a bit more with this book. That being said, if you are familiar with Justin's videos, there really isn't anything new in the book from what he says/does in his videos. So if you are looking for something new, you may be disappointed. I purchased this mainly because I am a visual learner and seeing strumming patterns and lyrics right in front of me makes learning a lot easier (as opposed to watching Justin's videos over and over again). If you have surpassed the beginner level in Justin's guitar course, I'd recommend skipping this.

You’ll also notice that each button requires a different amount of pressure in order for the chord to play properly. The further away the buttons are from the guitar’s nut, the less pressure is required. Vice-versa, the closer you get to the nut, the more pressure is required (i.e. blue button requires the least amount of pressure while the yellow button requires the most).
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.
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