The iconic Les Paul Standard is celebrated by the world’s greatest musicians as the standard for perfection in the world of electric guitars. The new Les Paul Standard features the popular asymmetrical SlimTaper neck profile with Ultra-Modern weight relief for increased comfort and playability. Impeccable looks are highlighted by the powerful tonewood combination of mahogany back and carved maple AAA figured top. BurstBucker Pro humbuckers provide modern and classic tones, while immense tonal variety from comes from 4 push-pull knobs. Includes hardshell case.
While there is something to be said for learning in this way, it is by no means the quickest (or most effective) way to learn how to play guitar. In fact, you may find that you end up missing out on a lot of the fundamental information that you really should have as a guitar player. As a result, it is not surprising that online guitar lessons are now becoming extremely popular.
This class is perfect for beginners who are ready to build their guitar repertoire. You’ll learn the major scale, both vertically and horizontally, as well as open position scales. Barre chords and basic chords in open position will give you a great starting point for the rest of your guitar journey. Once you get down these essentials you’ll be ready to take on any new challenges!
NOTE! We get asked all the time why a guitar educational company with so many advanced courses would offer such a simple solution to learning guitar without having to learn how to read music, learn theory or work through a more "formal" learning methodology. The answer is really simple; you never stop learning music but you do have to start. If your introduction to music is boring, tedious and generally a struggle, you'll likely pack the guitar up in its case and stick it in the closet. If it's fun, engaging and you can prove to yourself that you can really do it, then you'll spend a lifetime enjoying and learning guitar. Hopefully, TrueFire and our massive library of instruction will enhance that lifetime of enjoyment.
Of course, this top-down lecturing is all very abstract without examples. Let me give you the worst case scenario. My school talent show, 2008. Two friends of mine performED an ambitious but utterly inappropriate Metallica cover in front of the other students, their parents and the faculty. It was excruciating. Although the solos (presumably the only thing they had bothered to practice) were technically flawless, the whole song was undone by their terrible rhythm. The timing of the song became displaced, the chords were so badly fingered that it was difficult to hear the riff and consequently the whole performance fell apart. They looked like morons. They had sacrificed learning basic rhythm and paid the price. Make sure you don’t do the same.
Unfortunately, before you begin playing, you'll really need to tune your guitar. The problem is, it is, at first, a relatively difficult task, one that becomes much easier over time. If you know of anyone who plays guitar, who could do the job for you, it is advised that you get them to tune your instrument. Alternately, you could invest in a "guitar tuner," a relatively inexpensive device which listens to the sound of each string and advises you (via a few blinking lights) on what you need to do in order to get the note in tune.
When my granddaughters were young, Missy worked tirelessly to create lesson plans for my granddaughters in order to keep them interested in music. For example, if my younger granddaughter (3rd grade at the time) was unmotivated to practice in her workbooks at home, Missy would spend part of a lesson just talking with my granddaughter about what music she was currently enjoying. Then Missy would incorporate that music into her lesson plan. As a result, my granddaughter became once again motivated to practice. Missy makes lessons fun while still teaching technique.
4.) Check the guitar’s string height by pressing down on the first, second, and third fret. You should be able to do so with minimal effort. Come to the 12th fret and press down. The distance from the top of fret to the bottom of the string should be no more than three times. If it is five times, the guitar may have a warped neck or too high of a bridge.
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