Throughout the Beginner Guitar Quick-Start Series, we’ll include the most important things you need to know be successful at playing guitar right away. First we’ll cover basics like how to tune your guitar, how to hold your guitar, and the parts of the guitar. After that, we’ll get into technique, how to strum, how to make your first chords, and how to play your first song.
The songs are arranged from easy beginners chords and layer up as you go thought the book. but they really work best with the website where Justin plays and teaches you how to play them then adds a few tricks and skills to advance each song too, so try watch all the songs even if you're not too interested in the song because there are gems of wisdom in them all. (I drew the line at Britney spears tho ;)
My business was created because of one of the most powerful forces in the universe–love. My daughter desperately wanted to play guitar like her daddy. Like most new guitar students, she was having trouble learning to play. It pained her to quit but she was frustrated and was going to give up. My daughter came to me and said, “Daddy, can’t you do anything to help me play guitar?” I invented the ChordBuddy because I love my daughter and now, she plays and teaches guitar just like her daddy.
The filming of the videos is probably the biggest giveaway that this is a free site, as there is no pristine studio, crystal clear audio, or simultaneous multiple camera angles – just Justin sitting wherever he is that day, playing his guitar, and showing you what to do. It’s certainly not bad, but obviously lacks the polish of the paid-for tutorial sites.
Now, that we know about the basic parts of a guitar, it's time to get our hands dirty and start learning to play it. Get yourself an armless chair, and take a seat. You should be sitting comfortably, with your back against the back of the chair. Slouching significantly is a no-no; you'll not only end up with a sore back, you'll develop bad habits on the guitar.
I've subscribed to Guitar Tricks for a couple years, and have been pleased with the quality of both the content and the instructors. I intended to take a break from guitar lessons, but my annual subscription auto-renewed before I could cancel it. I contacted Guitar Tricks via their website messaging system and requested a refund of the annual fee. My request was immediately acknowledged, and by the next morning my refund was processed ... no questions, no hesitation. They left the door open to reactivate my subscription at some future point, but in the meantime mentioned they were glad to have had me on board, and wished me the best in all my endeavors. Very classy and professional, with customer satisfaction clearly evident in their handling of my request. I recommend Guitar Tricks not only for their quality content, but also for their approach towards satisfying their customers.
Playing like a pro? Sorry, but learning which colour button to press does not a guitar player make. If a learner removed the bits after two months and thought he/she could play, they would still have fingers which would need a hard pad to be developed. Watching those vids does not convince me at all.knowing how to press a string is not learnt by pressing a button in my humble opinion

So anyhow, both GuitarTricks and JamPlay are great sites, it all comes down to you, the student. If you are diligent and dedicate enough time and practice to it, you’ll succeed either way. The reason I recommend GuitarTricks to beginners is because it gives them one less chance to sidestep and wonder around looking at other teacher’s lessons when things get a bit harder. That’s what a lot of people do on my site.
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.

We believe that Guitar practice as an adult is more productive than it seems because it clears your head, it builds patience, discipline and concentration skills which you can transfer over to other parts of life, and it keeps your hand-eye coordination sharp. It also keeps you committed to learning and improvement, which again, are transferable traits to professional life. As role models, parents taking active classes shows kids the importance of pursuing personal interests for life.

If you alternate fretted notes with open strings you can create a cascading sound of awesomeness. The video below describes how you can take a scale and substitute as many fretted notes as you want with open strings (E, A, D, G, B, E). The beginning of the lick in the video starts off by descending the G Mixolydian scale (G, A, B, C, D, E, F) from G: G (fretted), F (fretted), E (open), D (fretted), C (fretted), B (open), A (fretted), G (fretted). The video below shows the rest of the lick. This second video demonstrates descending and ascending scales while using open strings!

Here you'll find the JustinGuitar range of books. Method Books include The Beginner's Course and the Intermediate Method. Songbooks include the Beginner Songbook (our biggest seller, over 100,000 copies sold), Volume 2 (an equal, not a sequel!) and a selection of Intermediate Level Songbooks in various styles: Acoustic, Rock, Pop and Vintage (hits from the 60's-80's). These start with "Beginner Plus" which are great for Beginner's consolidating their knowledge and then move onto songs using barre chords and more complex techniques for Intermediate players. There's also a Beginner Ukulele Songbook! I just have one Transcription Book at the moment, the Blues Lead Guitar Solos Book, but more are in the works. Due to the popularity of my site in Germany, we have two titles translated into German!
Minutes 60-600. Pick up the guitar everyday for 20 days for 30 minutes or so. You can do this while you do other things like watch TV or chit chat. Get your fingers used to moving around on the fretboard. Start jamming out some John Denver baby. Please do sing along. Eventually try to keep up with tempo of the changes in the actual song. Once you can change your chords on time, focus on improving your “touch” with your right hand. Strum the chords in a way that it adds texture to the recording (if you are playing along with the man himself.)
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