I bet that you’ve even tried other methods to figure it out. Spending hours on YouTube and google searching for some guitar method that will get you to the level you want, just to get bogged down in the TRUCKLOADS of seemingly unrelated material… Getting some friends that play guitar to show you something here and there, learning some songs off of tabs that are sometimes right and sometimes terribly, terribly wrong just to find that you’re stuck playing the same old things without knowing what to do next.
Because people learn in a variety of different ways, the flexibility of the online guitar lessons that you choose will be important. You may prefer to progress through a series of programs or you may want to jump around and pick whatever interests you. Not all online guitar lessons work in the same way, so you will want to consider which programs offer the best “fit” for the way you learn best.
Wow! This post really seems to have helped a lot of folks get started with the guitar. It has been read by – I kid you not – millions of aspiring guitarists. Thank you! As many of you have noted in the comments below, no, I’m not selling anything here related to playing the guitar. My motivation to write this post was that musicians, and especially guitar teachers, can often make learning the guitar sound way too hard. It’s actually easy.

What is particularly beneficial about this system is that you do not have to follow a particular structure of lessons. You can choose to learn whatever you want, whenever you want. All lessons can be viewed on your iPhone or iPad, as well as your computer so you can learn and practice wherever you happen to be. This makes it ideal for people who travel, students, as well as those who just want to practice in the privacy of their bedroom.
In their quest to innovate, I think JamPlay really took the camera angle thing overboard. Sometimes they show so many angles of hands on the screen, that it can get confusing and not intuitive at all. There is an camera angle which I really dislike, the "teacher angle", which is a camera above the teacher aiming at his fretting hand. Mixing angles of the same hand on a screen is not cool, I literally get dizzy watching it.
While the average viewership of six million may watch the show for the entertainment, it also provides a weekly education on how to successfully sell your product to high-profile prospects. And believe it or not, we can take away a lot of sales lessons from those success stories. Below I’ve identified the top 5 most successful Shark Tank businesses and what we can learn from them.
There’s only one thing I would comment on, and that is GF1 and 2 is lead by the same person, and the only songs you’re going to be playing are what I’d term as country love songs. If you’re ok with that, then you’re all set. If (like me) this sort of music grates on you, you’re going to find 1&2 very hard, and like me you’ll need to find some other way of practicing the lessons.
The larger choice of lessons on Jamplay is intriguing, but I don’t know. I think I’ll try GT first since it has a longer refund period, and if it doesn’t work out for me, I’ll just get my money back and head on over to jamplay. I mean it’s not like we’re talking about exorbitant amount of $$$ 🙂 I mean the $15 monthly price is like 20 minutes with a live teacher, that’s pretty ridiculous…

These reviews are repasted everywhere and a primary difference always given between GuitarTricks and JamPlay is the price. This being the case, it is worth noting that JamPlay also has a yearly subscription offer which lowers the price substantially. The reviewer noted that the annual membership brings the monthly fee down to $10.75. I don’t believe it was mentioned in the JamPlay review (at least not when I read it) that the annual fee there brings the monthly fee down to about $11.66. Additionally, it is relatively easy to find a 10% of coupon code for any membership at JamPlay which brings the monthly fee down around $10.50!
The review isn’t sponsored or endorsed in any way. This is our view of the platform of GuitarTricks and it is up to each reader to decide if we are a trusty resource for information. You can always get the free trial (without clicking on any link if it troubles you in any way) and you can come back here and let us know if you agree with our review or if you think its a clumsy sales page in disguise! 🙂

"My wife found Chris online for guitar lessons for our 7 year old. After just a few weeks, my 7 year old was doing really cool things with his new guitar. Chris sent us printouts of the weekly lessons so my son could practice during the week. And now I've been learning the lessons too. Any teacher who can keep my son's attention for a full half hour (sometimes he even goes over) AND actually teach him something too is a great teacher!"
* Make your guitar talk - With a little practice, a whammy bar and a wah wah effect pedal you can make your guitar talk by simulating voices. The trick here is to start with the whammy bar depressed and raise it up while fretting notes and sliding to other notes. Try making words by alternating between depressing and releasing the bar during note changes. The wah wah pedal (or a phaser pedal) helps to give it this trick a more vocal sound.
I’ve always wanted to play a guitar. My wife bought me a Martin about 6 years ago. I’m a truck dri...ver with very limited time at home for any lessons and practice so that hurt my ability. Saw the Chordbuddy on a YouTube video and after researching it, I decided to purchase one figuring that it was worth a shot at that price. I received it on October 7th and tried it for the first time the next day. Within 15 minutes I was playing Tom Dooley. Within an hour I was playing Head Over Boots by John Pardi which is not in any of the Chordbuddy songbooks. I used an app called Tabs and started looking for songs with the 4 chords G,D,C and Em.

A large selection (140+) of songs is available at this stage under the heading 'Songs Made Easy'. These are popular songs simplified for the student to begin to practise and develop. Perfect – that's why most people play, right? We want to play the songs we love and build more songs in our repertoire. All the crucial details are included like of how to set your guitar and amp for the specific sound/effect you want.
Unfortunately, before you begin playing, you'll really need to tune your guitar. The problem is, it is, at first, a relatively difficult task, one that becomes much easier over time. If you know of anyone who plays guitar, who could do the job for you, it is advised that you get them to tune your instrument. Alternately, you could invest in a "guitar tuner," a relatively inexpensive device which listens to the sound of each string and advises you (via a few blinking lights) on what you need to do in order to get the note in tune.

Some instructors spend too much time talking about theory and other things mixed right in with the middle of the song instruction, irrelevant to actually learning the song, and then fly way to rapidly though the chords, progressions and riffs, making learning difficult and multiple rewinds and replays necessary. (Example; Behind Blue Eyes by Mark Olesky. )
Lesson pages also feel similar in layout to what you would find on the leading tutorial sites such as GuitarTricks and JamPlay. The majority of lessons – whether song, chord or technique – follow a similar structure. On the lesson page you will find the video lesson itself, as well as some accompanying tips and text including notes on the song and the chords used.
One other cool thing about electric guitars– you can plug them into your computer and use a program like Apple’s Garageband as an amplifier. You can basically have 100’s of classic sounds available virtually. You can “jam” virtually with your computer and create full-on recordings on your laptop. You’ll just need a “pre-amp,” which is a device that amplifies the signal from your guitar before it sends it to your computer. I’d recommend something like the Focusrite Scarlett
Once you’re comfortable playing the chord shape that corresponds to the tab you removed, you can move on to removing the next tab, the next tab, and the next tab. Once all of the tabs are removed, the ultimate goal is that you should have a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts of how to play guitar and shouldn’t require the Chordbuddy anymore. At this point, you can remove the Chordbuddy system completely from your guitar and you’re free to explore.
Sales Lesson – Learn how to negotiate and focus on the other side of the deal, not yours. When you focus on your own limitations, you miss the big picture. You will feel more powerful when you recognize the reasons for purchase on the other side of the table. In this case, Scrub Daddy had offers from multiple investors and realized more pressure was on the investors and negotiated a better deal.
Although practicing the previous chromatic scale will certainly provide you with great benefits (like limbering up your fingers), it is admittedly not a whole lot of fun. Most people love to play "chords" on the guitar. Playing a chord involves using your pick to strike at least two notes (often more) on the guitar simultaneously. The following are three of the most common, and easy to play chords on the guitar.
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.
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