Beginner to advanced, acoustic to electric, blues to country... we have the guitar lessons you need to move your playing forward. We consistently film, edit and publish around 11 hours of new guitar lessons every 30 days; an enormous amount of material to keep your playing focused and interests piqued. With new lessons added on a daily basis, you cannot find another company as dedicated to teaching you how to play guitar as JamPlay.
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Some young players get the idea that you have to first master basic chords and scales before you can move on to playing songs you know by bands you love. Not so. Of course if you are into classical music, progressive metal or jazz that may be true, but you might be surprised to know that much of the rock and country music you hear is based around very simple chord progressions.
This is why it’s important to have someone that holds you accountable for prolonging your learning and practicing, regardless of whether it’s a musical instrument, or a sport, or any other after-school matter. Someone to keep you motivated. And if you decide to make your passion a profession, someone to guide you along the way on how to find the right opportunities for paid gigs, or even a full-time career in playing the Guitar.
Entering into the site and having a good look round reveals that it is almost easier to say who Guitar Tricks is NOT for. And basically that would be anyone who doesn't want to play the guitar. Joking apart, what I wanted to say is that the member area is very easy to understand; even if you're starting learning guitar from scratch you'll find it really easy to use.
Lesson text is a short summary of the lesson, while the lesson series shows you all of the different videos contained in the series, allowing you to pick whichever one you might want to view. So be aware that one lesson doesn’t usually equal one video. It’s often closer to ten separate videos. Though the interface is intuitive and easy to navigate.

There is no way to mark or loop song sub-sections, so it is hunt and guess tryin to find the section you want to repeat without wasting time listening to the irrelevant taking and or parts you already know again and again . The theory may be interesting , but should come in separate sections, NOT in the middle of trying to learn to play a part of the song. Songs should be broken down into smaller sections for learning , or have ability to mark and loop sub-sections so you can repeat as needed.
Some instructors spend too much time talking about theory and other things mixed right in with the middle of the song instruction, irrelevant to actually learning the song, and then fly way to rapidly though the chords, progressions and riffs, making learning difficult and multiple rewinds and replays necessary. (Example; Behind Blue Eyes by Mark Olesky. )
The neck of the guitar adjoins the "body" of the instrument. The body of the guitar will vary greatly from guitar to guitar. Most acoustic and classical guitars have a hollowed out body, and a "sound hole," designed to project the sound of the guitar. Most electric guitars have a solid body, and thus will not have a sound hole. Electric guitars will instead have "pick-ups" where the soundhole is located. These "pick-ups" are essentially small microphones, which allow the capture the sound of the ringing strings, allowing them to be amplified.

Strum your guitar with a pick or your fingers. Hold down the strings with your fingers in the appropriate shape and try to strum with your other hand. Acoustic guitar strings often have higher actions than electric guitars, so you may have to press down very hard to get a good sound. If the chord comes out muted, try holding down the strings with more force. If your string is buzzing, move your finger further away from the metal fret on your neck.[7]
These reviews are repasted everywhere and a primary difference always given between GuitarTricks and JamPlay is the price. This being the case, it is worth noting that JamPlay also has a yearly subscription offer which lowers the price substantially. The reviewer noted that the annual membership brings the monthly fee down to $10.75. I don’t believe it was mentioned in the JamPlay review (at least not when I read it) that the annual fee there brings the monthly fee down to about $11.66. Additionally, it is relatively easy to find a 10% of coupon code for any membership at JamPlay which brings the monthly fee down around $10.50!

Guitar Tricks is an online guitar course designed to teach the guitar, and so much more besides. Actually, they invented the concept of online guitar lessons back in 1998, even before Youtube existed! It is right up there in the top sites for learning guitar, may even be the best. Personal preference may ultimately dictate which of the sites you prefer, but definitely, we are talking of top-notch quality lessons.
In 2007 he started Chocolate Cake Productions with friend Jed Wardley to release his instructional DVDs. By June 2012 there are 11 DVDs available, including "Master The Major Scale", "Really Useful Strumming Techniques", a "Solo Blues Guitar" series, "The JustinGuitar Beginner's Course" and "Intermediate Method". Sandercoe also publishes a number of electronic books in .pdf format, including "Practical Music Theory", "The Chord Construction Guide" and "Understanding Rhythm Notation", as well as an ongoing series of instructional songbooks, to which entries include the Vintage Songbook, the Rock Songbook, the Pop Songbook, and the Acoustic Songbook.
Play the song with the audio recording. Once you've mastered the individual portions of the song, you're ready to play the song in its entirety. Play the song and strum your guitar along with the song. Try to keep up with the tempo of the song you're covering. Follow the tabs as you play. If you mess up, follow the music on the tabs and come back into the song when you're ready. Once you've become proficient at playing the riff, continue practicing until you don't need the tabs anymore.

I was lucky enough to meet Justin at the Guitar Institute during a summer school in 2004, and to have some private lessons with him afterwards.  He was the teacher who kickstarted my guitar career and persuaded me that I was ready to join a band.  That was 14 years ago and many dozens of gigs later.  I’m now just finishing a degree in Popular Music Performance.  Justin's online lessons are easy to follow and he has a manner about him which makes you believe that you can achieve.  Where he demonstrates songs, I have found his versions to be consistently more accurate and easy to follow than those of any other online teacher.  On this website you really will find all the skills and information you need to become an excellent musician.  Many thanks. Ian.
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.
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