Jamplay is often considered as the main competitor of Guitar Tricks (see our Jamplay review here). In my opinion, both Jamplay and Guitar Tricks are top of their game. They have many fantastic things in common and each appeal to a wide range of guitarists at all levels. There are some differences of course and these potentially make one more appealing to you than the other; for a step-by-step, see our GuitarTricks vs Jamplay Review, where I discuss which one is best for you.

"My partner and I scheduled lessons together with Jaime to learn the guitar. We are both beginners, so we chose Jaime because of his several reviews of being very knowledgable about the guitar and patient with people, which proved to be true. Overall, our first experience with Jaime was great! We really enjoyed our lesson and look forward to many more."


Lesson pages also feel similar in layout to what you would find on the leading tutorial sites such as GuitarTricks and JamPlay. The majority of lessons – whether song, chord or technique – follow a similar structure. On the lesson page you will find the video lesson itself, as well as some accompanying tips and text including notes on the song and the chords used.

Now that your Chordbuddy is in its proper placement and angled upwards, all you need to do is retighten the screw. Be sure to make it fairly tight so that it doesn’t move around as you start playing. Once that’s done, try playing all of your guitar strings without pressing down on any buttons. If the strings all ring clearly, you’ve properly installed the Chordbuddy. Here’s what it should look like when it’s installed.

I have looked at both Jamplay and Guitar Tricks. I found Jamplay to be some what impressive but hard to navigate,cluttered with useless “gadgets” and the instruction rather robotic from some instructors, on the other hand Guitar Tricks was warm,inviting,easy to navigate,the instruction was short sweet and to the point with tab and notes to accompany each lesson.This is such a structured site which can easily bring a beginner to an advanced/professional level provided you do your share and follow the suggestions on this site.I have found everything I will ever need to become the guitarist I’ve always dreamed of,oh by the way the cost is a steal compared to private lessons for one teacher,did I mention I have 45 teachers?
If you take the rock 1 course for example, an advanced course, most of the technical stuff is just not explained, teacher says “just remember to move by 3 frets, or just remember it is like that, you don’t need to understand why for now”. And yeah it becomes frustrating to have to look on internet very often when you pay exactly for not having to go somewhere else.
Thinking you can use this chord buddy video to learn how to play guitar is like thinking you can use... Tiger Woods golf clubs to win the masters. Knowing which strings to target when you strum and when to switch chords is much more challenging than he makes it look. Having a professional guitarist play using the device to show how easy it is to play is deceptive. See More

 Richard Bennett on justinguitar.com! Richard Bennett (www.richard-bennett.com) "There's an abundance of guitar information out there on the web, some good, some not. I stumbled across Justin Sandercoe's site a year ago and now tell everyone about it. The lessons are conveyed so clearly, concisely and in the most congenial way. The site is laid out logically as well so you can to go straight to your area of interest... beginner, blues, rock, folk, jazz, rhythm, fingerpicking... it's all there and more. Spend ten minutes with Justin and you'll not only play better but feel better too. From novice to know-it-all, everyone will learn something from Sandercoe."

Wow! This post really seems to have helped a lot of folks get started with the guitar. It has been read by – I kid you not – millions of aspiring guitarists. Thank you! As many of you have noted in the comments below, no, I’m not selling anything here related to playing the guitar. My motivation to write this post was that musicians, and especially guitar teachers, can often make learning the guitar sound way too hard. It’s actually easy.


So, don't get too caught up in strums, as the best approach is to start any new song with this basic down strum. Then, hit the strings on the way up as well, the down-up strum while counting "1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and." This way you are making twice the amount of sound with the same hand motion, giving you a little more movement and fuller accompaniment to a vocal line (melody).
My granddaughters took voice, guitar, and piano from Missy from the age of third grade through high school. I selected Missy due to her experience: classically trained on piano and voice during her formative years, studied at Berklee College of Music, Boston, toured the country as a solo singer/songwriter, and played world-famous and iconic venues, including the late CBGBs in New York City and the Bluebird in Nashville. You can find her on iTunes, and one of her students, Paul Thomas Mitchell (a.k.a. Tommy Mitchell) was on the hit television show, America's Got Talent.
So I signed up and personally didn't like the tutorials and navigation of the site so I cancelled my subscription. I did however feel I should leave a review to point out that when I contacted admin the response was always fast and they refunded me as they state they will. Seems like a trustworthy company with fast response times if you contact them, unfortunately it just wasn't for me. Thanks

When learning an instrument like guitar it is essential to have close ups of the fingers, along with slow playing that way you can see where your fingers go. It's annoying to no end when a site zooms out to show the instructor jamming, not letting me know what their fingers are doing! Fortunately, GuitarTricks is not guilty of this too often, they slip up a few times but make up for it by adding tabs on the side so you know what you are missing.


Unfortunately, before you begin playing, you'll really need to tune your guitar. The problem is, it is, at first, a relatively difficult task, one that becomes much easier over time. If you know of anyone who plays guitar, who could do the job for you, it is advised that you get them to tune your instrument. Alternately, you could invest in a "guitar tuner," a relatively inexpensive device which listens to the sound of each string and advises you (via a few blinking lights) on what you need to do in order to get the note in tune.
Shark Tank, a popular American reality television series on ABC, started its 5th season this September. For those who are unfamiliar, Shark Tank portrays the initial pitch between investors and entrepreneurs in a shortened televised format. There are many deals made on the show, but after due diligence that’s done afterwards, about half of those deals actually come to fruition.
In their quest to innovate, I think JamPlay really took the camera angle thing overboard. Sometimes they show so many angles of hands on the screen, that it can get confusing and not intuitive at all. There is an camera angle which I really dislike, the "teacher angle", which is a camera above the teacher aiming at his fretting hand. Mixing angles of the same hand on a screen is not cool, I literally get dizzy watching it.
3/4 Size Acoustic: I also have a 3/4 Scale Guitar in my apartment because they are awesome to sit beside your couch and just pick up easily and jam with. I bought the guitar a few months ago, and when I was playing it a concerned shopper came up to me and reminded me “that’s for kids you know.” I laughed. Fair enough, but I think little guitars are cool to have around the house, so if you do too (or if you have really small hands) perhaps this could be the guitar for you.
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